FAQ

GENERAL FAQs

What is AdmissionsDean?

AdmissionDean is a free social networking site that provides law school applicants and students with a place research, meet, and discuss everything related to law school. Prospective law students are welcome to use the AdmissionsDean site to research law schools, browse our “Top 10” lists, read our interviews with law school admissions deans and professors, as well as discussion board posts. The real power of AdmissionsDean is unleashed, however, when users register (anonymously) and input some basic information about themselves, like their LSAT score(s), UGPA, and what law schools they have applied to. Then they will be able to track specific law schools and, more importantly, specific applicants to see who’s getting into (or rejected by) which schools so they can better assess your own admissions chances. Tracking applicants also helps users identify schools that may not currently be on their radar screen, but should be.

To help facilitate our users’ research and discussion, we have developed the most comprehensive and up-to-date law school database on ABA and non-ABA approved law schools, and a next-generation discussion board and communications platform that allows law school applicants and students to talk amongst themselves and share their experiences. We provide all this for free, and we’re committed to growing with the needs of law school applicants and students.

Do I have to register to use this AdmissionsDean?

Absolutely not. Unregistered guests are welcome to use the AdmissionsDean site to research law schools, browse our “Top 10” lists, read our interviews with law school admissions deans and professors, as well as discussion board posts. The real power of AdmissionsDean is unleashed, however, when users register (anonymously) and input some basic information about themselves like their LSAT score(s), UGPA and what law schools they have applied to. Then they will be able to track specific law schools and, more importantly, specific applicants to see who’s getting into (or rejected by) which schools so they can better assess your own admissions chances. Tracking applicants also helps users identify schools that may not currently be on their radar screen, but should be.

Will other users be able to identify me on AdmissionsDean?

Not unless you want them to. If you pick a username without any identifying information, choose not to share your email address with anyone and don’t upload a real picture of yourself for your avatar, it would be nearly impossible to personally identify you on the site.

However, with that type of anonymity comes responsibility. In order to provide the most accurate admissions assessments for you and other users, we ask that AdmissionsDean users be as truthful and accurate as they can when including information in their user profiles. Additionally, anonymity in certain forums – like our discussion boards – can occasionally tempt even the most mild mannered law school applicants and students to post some pretty outrageous and abusive things. We hope and expect you to keep your conversations lively, informative, inquisitive, humorous, and civil. While we do not moderate discussions, we reserve the right delete offensive posts that are brought to our attention, and to ban any user from the discussion boards or AdmissionsDean generally for inappropriate conduct.

Why would I want to enter my personal law school admissions information on AdmissionsDean?

First, although you may be entering in personal information about yourself like your undergraduate GPA and your LSAT score, the site is anonymous.

Second, AdmissionsDean is like pretty much anything worthwhile in life: you’ll get out of it what you put into it. If you simply want to be a voyeur and occasionally post your views on our discussion boards or research law schools, then you don’t need to do much more than set up an account and not include any real information about your academic achievements. If, however, you want to assess your admissions chances and see how you stack up against other applicants to a particular law school, or if you want to search for specific applicants who may have similar numbers as you to see where they are applying/getting in (or even getting scholarship money!), then we suggest you fill out your user profile as completely as possible.

How reliable is the information on your site?

Much of the data on AdmissionsDean is taken directly from the information that the law schools self-report to the American Bar Association and Law School Admissions Council, as well as information from the websites of law schools, LSAT providers, and admissions consultants. This data is inputted by our tireless AdmissionsDean staff members who do their best to make sure it is inputted as reported. AdmissionsDean is the author of the law school write-ups and other substantive content on the website, and we undertake significant efforts to ensure its accuracy and correct any inaccuracies that are brought to our attention. By contrast, the applicant data, is inputted/updated directly by our users and while there is an incentive for them to input real and accurate admissions data in order to get the most out of using our site, we have no way of verifying the representations like their admissions status or scholarship money they claim to have received from a particular school. Likewise, we do not undertake efforts to ensure the accuracy of Discussion Board posts.

How do I close my AdmissionsDean account and delete my profile?

If you would like to close your AdmissionsDean account, email us and we will deactivate it. However, pursuant to our Terms of Use we will keep your admissions data viewable to other users who may be interested in seeing your profile when assessing their own admissions chances in subsequent admissions cycles.

I think I might have found a statistical or substantive error on your site. How do I bring it to your attention so you can change it?

Accidents do happen and we ascribe to the adage: “It takes a village to raise a website.” If you find an error, then simply report it to us at admin@admissionsdean.com and we’ll take it from there.

How can I connect with another AdmissionsDean user?

That’s easy! Simply click on the “Wall” tab of any user profile and make a public comment on their wall.

Can I send a private message to another AdmissionsDean user?

Sure! Login to your account and click on the “Messages” link within your profile. You will see a sub-link entitled “Compose Message.” Click on that link and then search for a specific user using the “Find A Member” tool and add them to the “To” field of your message. Then write a message and send it. Users will receive an email notifying them of your private message.

RANKINGS FAQ

What are the Leiter Rankings?

The Leiter Rankings refer to the popular, well-respected law school rankings published by Professor Brian Leiter of the University of Chicago Law School. You can review Professor Leiter’s rankings/methodologies by visiting www.leiterrankings.com.

What’s does your AdmissionsDean Selectivity Ranking seek to capture?

While no rankings system is perfect, we have created the AdmissionsDean Selectivity Ranking, which tries to capture how selective a school is when choosing its students. Our selectivity score is calculated by assigning weights to two almost universal admissions data points: the 75th percentile LSAT score and the 75th percentile UGPA of a law school's matriculating students. There is much discussion among admissions officers and academics alike on whether the 75% LSAT score is more effective than the median or 25% LSAT score at a particular school. We think the 75% LSAT score advocates have the better arguments, because the top of the class better reflects the ability of a law school to attract the most competitive law students possible. In addition, each law school has a different policy with respect to diversity and non-traditional candidates, who often disproportionately fall below the median LSAT score. Similarly, there is much debate on the utility of 75/25/median GPA data, principally because, on their own, they fail to account for the strength/competitiveness of the colleges and universities where those GPAs were earned. Earning a 3.5 GPA from School X is not necessarily the same thing as earning that grade at School Y, but GPA rankings alone do not take into account the distinction. Nevertheless, law school admissions offices almost universally factor applicants' GPAs into their admissions decisions and attempt to normalize GPAs through various methodologies. With this caveat in mind, we have adopted the 75% GPA ranking as part of our AD Selectivity ranking. Although each law school assigns different weight to LSAT and GPA scores, in our experience in talking with admissions officers, law schools in the aggregate roughly assign 65% weight to LSAT scores and 35% to GPA scores, so we have adopted this split. Thus, our AD SELECTIVITY SCORE = (RANK_OF(75% LSAT) * .65) + (RANK_OF(75% UGPA) * .35). It's not perfect, but it gives a rough approximation of a law school's selectivity using objective metrics, and the format is easily understood rather than being overly complicated.

What does your AdmissionsDean Poll of Polls seek to capture?

Not unlike an unweighted presidential election poll of polls, here we average the rankings from US News, Leiter and AdmissionsDean Selectivity to arrive at a Poll of Polls. If a particular school does not have rankings from all three bodies, the Poll of Polls simply averages the available rankings to arrive at its Poll of Polls ranking.

GLOSSARY

What is an underrepresented minority?

Most agree that, in terms of admissions criteria, "under-represented minorities" (URMs) include African Americans, Latinos, and Native Americans, but not Asian-Americans. While most law schools also positively consider other diversity criteria such as socio-economic background, disability, or sexual orientation, none of these, in general, is as much of a "plus" factor in admissions as URM status. Therefore, students usually self-identify as URM if they are African American, Latino, or Native American.

What is a non-traditional student?

Generally, law schools consider non-traditional applicants to be students applying to law school five or more years after graduating from college. Non-traditional applicants typically have engaged in meaningful work or life experiences for a significant period of time after college; many have even had successful non-legal careers in business, medicine or other fields. Law schools enjoy the diversity that non-traditional applicants bring to their student bodies, and law professors often find older law students provide unique, real-world perspectives to classroom discussions that greatly assist in teaching the law.

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