University of Texas School of Law

FACULTY AT A GLANCE

Student/Faculty
Ratio
Student/Faculty
Ratio Rank
Full-Time
Faculty
Full-Time
Faculty Rank
Female
Faculty
Female
Faculty Rank
Minority
Faculty
Minority
Faculty Rank
Class of 2015 Faculty 11.49:1 #18 81 #1 33 #14 10 #1

STUDENTS AT A GLANCE

Attrition Attrition Rank # of FT
Students
FT Class
Size Rank
Female
Students
Female
Students Rank
Minority
Students
Minority
Students Rank
Class of 2015 0.0% 15 370 22 - - 33.0% 47
All Students - - 1,136 22 45.9% 57 33.0% 47
 

SHOW STUDENT DETAILS

The School has approximately 90 full-time faculty members. In terms of both scholarly distinction and success in the classroom, The University of Texas School of Law has long had one of the most outstanding faculties in the nation. More than one-third of the faculty is elected to the American Law Institute, one of the highest percentage memberships in the nation. Six faculty members are former clerks for justices of the United States Supreme Court, and two faculty members clerked on the Supreme Court of Israel.

UT Law has a diverse student body - our current student body are graduates of 108 different colleges and universities, residents of 27 states, and have lived or worked in 38 countries across the globe. The Society Program, organized into eight societies, fosters students' interaction with faculty in small group settings and brings together first-year students with upperclassmen to facilitate a continuum of involvement during students' three years at the Law School. These societies are named for alumni closely associated with the Law School, such as Gloria Bradford, the first African American female graduate, and Leon Green, a 1915 graduate who was one of the twentieth century's most important torts scholars. Each society has approximately 150 students from all three classes, and has a faculty advisor and a society coordinator who plan activities for their groups. These societies engage in a wide range of public service, social, professional, and athletic activities throughout the year.

Outside of the classroom, students continue to learn and sharpen their research, writing and editing skills with their involvement with one (or more) of the 12 journals, including the Texas Law Review. The student journals program at UT Law is one of the most robust journals programs at any law school in the country. Over 600 students are involved in the production of more than 35 issues containing well over 5,000 pages of legal analysis every year.

UT Law students are generally active in at least one student organization based on their community, political, service and professional interests. There are more than 30 organizations for students to join, including the Texas Oil and Gas Law Society, Women's Law Caucus, and Assault & Flattery, the Law School's musical theater company.

With respect to student housing, most law students live off-campus. The centralized location of The University of Texas campus, along with the UT Shuttle System and Capitol Metro service, allows convenient access to many apartment complexes and housing communities located in the Austin area.

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